Pharmacy Residency (PGY1)

Hospital-Acquired Infections

Healthcare-associated infections, or HAIs, are infections that people get while they are getting treatment for another condition in a healthcare setting. HAIs can occur in all settings of care, including acute care hospitals, long-term acute care hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, surgical centers, cancer hospitals, and skilled nursing facilities. Many of these infections can be prevented through the use of proper procedures and precautions recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Hospitals receive reimbursement from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for services provided and based on hospital-acquired infection scores, hospitals may be charged penalties. 

Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections (CLABSI)


This measure compares the number of central line-associated bloodstream infections in a hospital’s intensive care unit to a national benchmark. Lower numbers are better. A score of zero (0) is best because it means there were no central line-associated bloodstream infections.

A central line is a narrow tube inserted by a doctor into a large vein of a patient's neck or chest to give important medical treatment. When not put in correctly or not kept clean, central lines can become an easy way for germs to enter the body and cause serious infections in the blood. These infections are called central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), and they can be deadly. CLABSIs are mostly preventable when healthcare providers use infection control steps recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

  Preferred Direction Parkland State Avg. National Avg.
  Hospital Acquired Infection Rates | July 2022 - June 2023
  
Central line-associated Blood Stream Infection (CLABSI) Rate
SIR in ICUs and select wards
1.438 N/A 1.000

Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI)


This measure compares the number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections in a hospital’s intensive care unit to a national benchmark. Lower numbers are better. A score of zero (0) is best because it means there were no catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

A catheter is a drainage tube that is inserted by a doctor into a patient’s urinary bladder through the urethra and is left in place to collect urine while a patient is immobile or incontinent. When not put in correctly or not kept clean, or if left in place for long periods of time, catheters can become an easy way for germs to enter the body and cause serious infections in the urinary tract. These infections are called catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), and they can cause additional illness or be deadly. CAUTIs are mostly preventable when healthcare providers use infection control steps recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

  Preferred Direction Parkland State Avg. National Avg.
  Hospital Acquired Infection Rates | July 2022 - June 2023
  
Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infection (CAUTI) Rate
SIR in ICUs only
0.830 N/A  1.000

Other Hospital Acquired Infections



  Preferred Direction Parkland State Avg. National Avg.
Hospital Acquired Infection Rates medical condition or complication that a patient develops during a hospital stay, which was not present at admission | July 2022 - June 2023
Surgical Site Infection Rate
Colon surgerycompares the number of surgical site infections among a hospital’s colon surgeries to a national benchmark
1.245 N/A 1.000
Surgical Site Infection Rate
Abdominal hysterectomy compares the number of surgical site infections among a hospital’s surgeries for abdominal hysterectomies to a national benchmark
1.303 N/A 1.000
MRSA Bacteremia
compares the number of infections caused by bacteria called Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in a hospital to a national benchmark
1.626 N/A 1.000
Clostridium Difficile
(C. Diff)compares the number of infections caused by bacteria called Clostridium Difficile in a hospital to a national benchmark
0.479 N/A 1.000


Updated 4/26/24